LIM/23 - Laboratório de Psicopatologia e Terapêutica Psiquiátrica

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O Laboratório de Psicopatologia e Terapêutica Psiquiátrica é ligado ao Departamento de Psiquiatria da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo (FMUSP).

Linhas de pesquisa: aspectos psicossociais dos transtornos mentais; epidemiologia dos transtornos mentais; epidemiologia psiquiátrica; metabolismo do glóbulo vermelho; personalidade; psicofarmacologia clínica; psicofisiologia clínica; psicometria; transtorno obsessivo-compulsivo e outros transtornos ansiosos na infância e adolescência.

Site oficial: http://limhc.fm.usp.br/portal/lim23-laboratorio-de-psicopatologia-e-terapeutica-psiquiatrica/

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article 53 Citação(ões) na Scopus
Age of onset and cumulative risk of mental disorders: a cross-national analysis of population surveys from 29 countries
(2023) MCGRATH, J. J.; AL-HAMZAWI, A.; ALONSO, J.; ALTWAIJRI, Y.; ANDRADE, L. H.; BROMET, E. J.; BRUFFAERTS, R.; ALMEIDA, J. M. C. de; CHARDOUL, S.; CHIU, W. T.; DEGENHARDT, L.; DEMLER, O. V.; FERRY, F.; GUREJE, O.; HARO, J. M.; KARAM, E. G.; KARAM, G.; KHALED, S. M.; KOVESS-MASFETY, V.; MAGNO, M.; MEDINA-MORA, M. E.; MOSKALEWICZ, J.; NAVARRO-MATEU, F.; NISHI, D.; PLANA-RIPOLL, O.; POSADA-VILLA, J.; RAPSEY, C.; SAMPSON, N. A.; STAGNARO, J. C.; STEIN, D. J.; HAVE, M. ten; TORRES, Y.; VLADESCU, C.; WOODRUFF, P. W.; ZARKOV, Z.; KESSLER, R. C.; AGUILAR-GAXIOLA, S.; ALTWAIJRI, Y. A.; ATWOLI, L.; BENJET, C.; BUNTING, B.; CALDAS-DE-ALMEIDA, J. M.; CARDOSO, G.; CíA, A. H.; GIROLAMO, G. De; HARRIS, M. G.; HINKOV, H.; HU, C.-Y.; JONGE, P. De; KARAM, A. N.; KAZDIN, A. E.; KAWAKAMI, N.; KESSLER, R. C.; KIEJNA, A.; MCGRATH, J. J.; PIAZZA, M.; SCOTT, K. M.; STEIN, D. J.; VIANA, M. C.; VIGO, D. V.; WILLIAMS, D. R.; WOODRUFF, P.; WOJTYNIAK, B.; XAVIER, M.; ZASLAVSKY, A. M.
Background: Information on the frequency and timing of mental disorder onsets across the lifespan is of fundamental importance for public health planning. Broad, cross-national estimates of this information from coordinated general population surveys were last updated in 2007. We aimed to provide updated and improved estimates of age-of-onset distributions, lifetime prevalence, and morbid risk. Methods: In this cross-national analysis, we analysed data from respondents aged 18 years or older to the World Mental Health surveys, a coordinated series of cross-sectional, face-to-face community epidemiological surveys administered between 2001 and 2022. In the surveys, the WHO Composite International Diagnostic Interview, a fully structured psychiatric diagnostic interview, was used to assess age of onset, lifetime prevalence, and morbid risk of 13 DSM-IV mental disorders until age 75 years across surveys by sex. We did not assess ethnicity. The surveys were geographically clustered and weighted to adjust for selection probability, and standard errors of incidence rates and cumulative incidence curves were calculated using the jackknife repeated replications simulation method, taking weighting and geographical clustering of data into account. Findings: We included 156 331 respondents from 32 surveys in 29 countries, including 12 low-income and middle-income countries and 17 high-income countries, and including 85 308 (54·5%) female respondents and 71 023 (45·4%) male respondents. The lifetime prevalence of any mental disorder was 28·6% (95% CI 27·9–29·2) for male respondents and 29·8% (29·2–30·3) for female respondents. Morbid risk of any mental disorder by age 75 years was 46·4% (44·9–47·8) for male respondents and 53·1% (51·9–54·3) for female respondents. Conditional probabilities of first onset peaked at approximately age 15 years, with a median age of onset of 19 years (IQR 14–32) for male respondents and 20 years (12–36) for female respondents. The two most prevalent disorders were alcohol use disorder and major depressive disorder for male respondents and major depressive disorder and specific phobia for female respondents. Interpretation: By age 75 years, approximately half the population can expect to develop one or more of the 13 mental disorders considered in this Article. These disorders typically first emerge in childhood, adolescence, or young adulthood. Services should have the capacity to detect and treat common mental disorders promptly and to optimise care that suits people at these crucial parts of the life course. Funding: None.
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A systematic review of pharmacological treatments for Internet Gaming Disorder
(2023) SA, Rafael Richard C. De; COELHO, Sophie G.; PARAMAR, Puneet K.; JOHNSTONE, Samantha; KIM, Hyoun S.; TAVARES, Hermano
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Betting onset, sex and gambling trajectories: Exploring subgroups of Gambling Disorder
(2023) GALETTI, Cecilia; ANGELO, Daniela Lopes; TAVARES, Hermano
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A transdiagnostic model of impulsive dimensions based on clinical reality - The ACEDA model
(2023) TAVARES, Hermano; ANGELO, Daniela Lopes; ANDRADE, Vinicius
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Impulse control disorder and addictive behaviors in compulsive buying disorder patients within and without the bipolar spectrum
(2023) MARANSALDI, Renata Fernandes; FILOMENSKY, Tatiana Zambrano; TAVARES, Hermano
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Spatial Normalization Discrepancies Between Native and MNI152 Brain Template Scans in Gamma Ventral Capsulotomy Patients
(2023) GIFF, Alexis; NOREN, Georg; MAGNOTTI, John; LOPES, Antonio Carlos; BATISTUZZO, Marcelo; HOEXTER, Marcelo; GREENBERG, Benjamin; MARSLAND, Richard; MIGUEL, Euripedes; RASMUSSEN, Steven; MCLAUGHLIN, Nicole
article 0 Citação(ões) na Scopus
Longitudinal Description and Prediction of Smoking Among Borderline Patients: An 18 Year Follow-Up Study
(2023) BRANAS, Marcelo J. A. A.; FRANKENBURG, Frances R.; TEMES, Christina M.; FITZMAURICE, Garrett M.; ZANARINI, Mary C.
Objective: The objectives of this study were (1) to compare smoking between recovered and non-recovered patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) over the course of 18 years and (2) to assess baseline predictors of tobacco use in patients with BPD. Methods: A total of 264 borderline patients were interviewed concerning their smoking history beginning at the 6-year follow-up wave in a longitudinal study of the course of BPD (McLean Study of Adult Development) and re -interviewed at 2-year intervals over the next 18 years. Initial data collection of the larger study happened between June 1992 and December 1995, and the DSM-III-R and the Revised Diagnostic Interview for Borderlines (DIB-R) were used as the diagnostic instruments for BPD.Results: Recovered patients had a 48% lower prevalence of smoking than non -recovered patients at 6-year follow-up (a significant difference; P=.01). Also, the rate of decline in smoking for the recovered group was 68% and was significantly faster (P= .008) than for the non-recovered group over the subsequent 18 years. Alcohol abuse or dependence (relative risk [RR]=1.22; 95% CI,1.06-1.40; P=.005), lower levels of education (RR=1.28; 95% CI,1.15-1.42; P<.001), and higher levels of the defense mechanism of denial (RR=1.08; 95% CI,1.03-1.13; P=.002) were significant predictors of smoking in borderline patients in multivariate analyses.Conclusions: Taken together, the results of this study suggest that recovery status was an important element in the prevalence of smoking among borderline patients over time. They also suggest that smoking was predicted by 3 factors: prior psychopathology, demographics, and psychological maturity.
article 0 Citação(ões) na Scopus
Patient Health Questionnaire-9 Item Pairing Predictiveness for Prescreening Depressive Symptomatology: Machine Learning Analysis
(2023) GLAVIN, Darragh; GRUA, Eoin Martino; NAKAMURA, Carina Akemi; SCAZUFCA, Marcia; SANTOS, Edinilza Ribeiro dos; WONG, Gloria H. Y.; HOLLINGWORTH, William; PETERS, Tim J.; ARAYA, Ricardo; VEN, Pepijn Van de
Background: Anhedonia and depressed mood are considered the cardinal symptoms of major depressive disorder. These are the first 2 items of the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ)-9 and comprise the ultrabrief PHQ-2 used for prescreening depressive symptomatology. The prescreening performance of alternative PHQ-9 item pairings is rarely compared with that of the PHQ-2.Objective: This study aims to use machine learning (ML) with the PHQ-9 items to identify and validate the most predictive 2-item depressive symptomatology ultrabrief questionnaire and to test the generalizability of the best pairings found on the primary data set, with 6 external data sets from different populations to validate their use as prescreening instruments.Methods: All 36 possible PHQ-9 item pairings (each yielding scores of 0-6) were investigated using ML-based methods with logistic regression models. Their performances were evaluated based on the classification of depressive symptomatology, defined as PHQ-9 scores >= 10. This gave each pairing an equal opportunity and avoided any bias in item pairing selection.Results: The ML-based PHQ-9 items 2 and 4 (phq2&4), the depressed mood and low-energy item pairing, and PHQ-9 items 2 and 8 (phq2&8), the depressed mood and psychomotor retardation or agitation item pairing, were found to be the best on the primary data set training split. They generalized well on the primary data set test split with area under the curves (AUCs) of 0.954 and 0.946, respectively, compared with an AUC of 0.942 for the PHQ-2. The phq2&4 had a higher AUC than the PHQ-2 on all 6 external data sets, and the phq2&8 had a higher AUC than the PHQ-2 on 3 data sets. The phq2&4 had the highest Youden index (an unweighted average of sensitivity and specificity) on 2 external data sets, and the phq2&8 had the highest Youden index on another 2. The PHQ-2 >= 2 cutoff also had the highest Youden index on 2 external data sets, joint highest with the phq2&4 on 1, but its performance fluctuated the most. The PHQ-2 >= 3 cutoff had the highest Youden index on 1 external data set. The sensitivity and specificity achieved by the phq2&4 and phq2&8 were more evenly balanced than the PHQ-2 >= 2 and >= 3 cutoffs.Conclusions: The PHQ-2 did not prove to be a more effective prescreening instrument when compared with other PHQ-9 item pairings. Evaluating all item pairings showed that, compared with alternative partner items, the anhedonia item underperformed alongside the depressed mood item. This suggests that the inclusion of anhedonia as a core symptom of depression and its presence in ultrabrief questionnaires may be incompatible with the empirical evidence. The use of the PHQ-2 to prescreen for depressive symptomatology could result in a greater number of misclassifications than alternative item pairings.