MARCO ANTONIO GONCALVES PONTES FILHO

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3
Projetos de Pesquisa
Unidades Organizacionais
Instituto de Ortopedia e Traumatologia, Hospital das Clínicas, Faculdade de Medicina - Médico

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Agora exibindo 1 - 10 de 19
  • conferenceObject
    RISK FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH UNFAVORABLE COVID-19 IN SPONDYLOARTHRITIS PATIENTS - DATA FROM THE REUMACOV-BRAZIL REGISTRY
    (2021) MARQUES, C.; CORDEIRO, L.; PAULA, M. D. de; GOIS, E.; MARIZ, H.; RIELLO, M.; PALACIOS, F.; PONTES FILHO, M.; Rocha Junior; SANTOS, F.; SANTOS, G.; SARTORI, N.; SCRIGNOLI, J.; SILVA, P.; PINHEIRO, M.
  • article 3 Citação(ões) na Scopus
    Sexual performance and pelvic floor muscle strength in patients with fibromyalgia: a controlled cross-sectional study
    (2021) FUSCO, Hellen Cristina Souza de Carvalho; PONTES FILHO, Marco Antonio; CONSOLO, Rafael Treitero; LUNARDI, Adriana Claudia; FERREIRA, Elizabeth Alves Goncalves
    Background Fibromyalgia (FM) is characterized by chronic and widespread pain, sleep disturbances, fatigue, psychological distress and morning stiffness. These patients also present symptoms such as depression, sexual dysfunctions and reproductive problems. Sexuality involves several aspects, including pelvic floor functionality, and one question is whether the sexual performance of women with fibromyalgia is associated with pelvic floor function or other characteristics of the disease. Objective The aim of this study was to gauge the association between perineal function and sexual performance in women with and without fibromyalgia. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study with 109 sexually active women from 19 to 65 years of age, either suffering from fibromyalgia (FM group, n = 51) or free from fibromyalgia (non-FM group, n = 58). Perineal function was measured with the use of perineometry and digital vaginal palpation (PERFECT Scheme), while sexual performance was assessed by the Sexual Quotient Female questionnaire (QS-F). Results Patients with fibromyalgia presented poor sexual performance compared to those without fibromyalgia (QS-F score 58 (32-66) vs. 66 (56-70); p = 0.002) as well as lower pelvic floor muscle strength measured by perineometry (32.5 (18.2-40.5) vs. 37.9 (23.4- 57.3); p = 0.03). Patients without fibromyalgia presented a positive correlation between perineometry and QS-F (r = 0.22; p = 0.038), while those with fibromyalgia presented no correlation between those two variables (r = 0.22; p = 0.12). The regression model showed an association between sexual performance and the presence of fibromyalgia, pelvic floor muscle strength (perineometry) and age, according to the following equation: sexual performance = 48.52 + (9.5 * non-FM group) + (0.23 * perineometry)-(0.4 * age), with adjusted R-2 = 0.19. Conclusion Women with FM present poor sexual performance and lower pelvic floor muscle strength compared to those without FM. However, the correlation between these variables among women without FM was not observed in women with FM. Sexual performance showed a positive association with absence of fibromyalgia and higher pelvic floor muscle strength, and a negative association with age.
  • conferenceObject
    Metabolic Syndrome: The Genesis of Nephrolithiasis in Gout Patients?
    (2012) MELLO, Filipi M.; TOMITA, Rafael B.; FULLER, Ricardo; FILHO, Marco Antonio G. P.; BARROS, Thiago B. M.; PRADO, Leandro L. do; AUGUSTO, Kristopherson L.; GOLDENSTEIN-SCHAINBERG, Claudia
    Background/Purpose: Gout patients have a high frequency of metabolic syndrome (MS), a disorder known to be associated with hyperinsulinemia. The latter condition augments proximal tubular sodium reabsorption and leads to reduced renal urate excretion and hyperuricemia. There are no data, however, evaluating whether MS can influence gout-associated clinical characteristics. Thus, we aimed to determine the prevalence of MS in our population and to investigate if the presence of MS would characterize a particular clinical and laboratorial gout profile. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study of 158 gout patients (ACR criteria). MS was defined in accordance to the National Cholesterol Education Program ATP III (NCEP-ATP III) and the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) criteria. Demographic, anthropometric (body mass index - BMI) and clinical data were evaluated. Fasting serum levels of UA, glucose, triglycerides and cholesterol fractions were analyzed by routine laboratory tests. Nephrolithiasis was demonstrated by usual ultrasonography and urate under-excretion defined as UA clearance lower than 7.5 ml/min. Statistical comparisons were performed using Fisher’s exact, chi-square, students T and Spearman’s tests and P<0.05 was considered significant. Results: The frequency of MS in gout patients was 73% and 71% according to NCEP ATPIII and IDF criteria respectively. Further comparison of 125 patients with MS and those 33 without this condition revealed similar mean ages (63.0 ± 11.5 vs 62.5 ± 12.9; p>0,05) and male predominance (94% and 75%). As expected, those with MS had higher BMI (30.2 ± 5.5kg/m2 vs 27.0 5.8kg/m2; p=0.005) and higher prevalences of systemic arterial hypertension (93.3% vs 75% p=0.012) and diabetes (25.8% vs 0, p=0.001), though comparable frequency of coronary artery disease (22.5% vs 16.7%; p=0.469). With regard to gout clinical/laboratorial characteristic, patients with MS had more nephrolitiasis (37.1% vs 16.7%, p=0.026), but they did not differ from patients without MS concerning the presence of tophi (52.8% vs. 55.6%; p = 0.780) or uric acid underexcretion (83.1% vs 94.4%; p=0.148). Current alcohol consumption, mean estimated creatinine clearance and mean serum levels of uric acid, were alike in both groups (p>0.05). Conclusion: The novel demonstration that MS in gout is associated to nephrolithiasis suggests that this condition may underlie the genesis of uric acid stones. Whether insulin resistance may account for a renal alteration that may ultimately impair buffering and amplification of acidic urine remains to be determined. Moreover, the elevated prevalence of MS in gout patients from our country (almost 3⁄4) is higher than overall rates of 63% MS in gout worldwide, indicating possible influence of dietary, geographical and/or genetic background.
  • bookPart
    Reumatismo de Partes Moles
    (2015) PONTES FILHO, Marco Antonio Gonçalves; AUGUSTO, Kristopherson Lustosa; FULLER, Ricardo
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    Postoperative Complications Rate in Orthopaedic Surgery Performed in Rheumatic Patients in Use of Biologic Agents
    (2015) PIMENTEL, Clarissa Queiroz; PAULA, Luiz Eduardo de; LUPPINO-ASSAD, Ana Paula; CAMANHO, Gilberto Luis; BONFA, Eloisa; PONTES FILHO, Marco Antonio Goncalves
  • bookPart
    Fribromialgia
    (2016) DOMICIANO, Diogo Souza; PONTES FILHO, Marco Antonio Gonçalves
  • article 20 Citação(ões) na Scopus
    Prescribed Versus Preferred Intensity Resistance Exercise in Fibromyalgia Pain
    (2018) RIBEIRO, Roberta P. da Cunha; FRANCO, Tathiane C.; PINTO, Ana J.; PONTES FILHO, Marco A. G.; DOMICIANO, Diogo S.; PINTO, Ana L. de Sa; LIMA, Fernanda R.; ROSCHEL, Hamilton; GUALANO, Bruno
    Exercise is the treatment of choice for fibromyalgia (FM), but little is known about resistance exercise prescription to modulate pain in this condition. This study aimed to compare the effects of different resistance exercise models, comprising self-selected or prescribed intensity, on pain in FM patients. In a cross-over fashion, 32 patients underwent the following sessions: (i) standard prescription (STD; 3 x 10 repetitions at 60% of maximal strength); (ii) self-selected load with fixed number of repetitions (SS); (iii) self-selected load with volume load (i.e., load x sets x repetitions) matched for STD (SS-VM); and (iv) self-selected load with a free number of repetitions until achieving score 7 of rating perceived exertion (SS-RPE). Pain, assessed by Visual Analogic Scale (VAS) and Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire (SF-MPQ), was evaluated before and 0, 24, 48, 72, and 96 h after the sessions. Load was significantly lower in SS, SS-VM, SS-RPE than in STD, whereas rating perceived exertion and volume load were comparable between sessions. VAS scores increased immediately after all sessions (p < 0.0001), and reduced after 48, 72, 96 h (p < 0.0001), remaining elevated compared to prevalues. SF-MPQ scores increased immediately after all exercise sessions (p = 0.025), then gradually reduced across time, reaching baseline levels at 24 h. No significant differences between sessions were observed. Both prescribed and preferred intensity resistance exercises failed in reducing pain in FM patients. The recommendation that FM patients should exercise at preferred intensities to avoid exacerbated pain, which appears to be valid for aerobic exercise, does not apply to resistance exercise.
  • conferenceObject
    EVALUATION OF SEXUAL FUNCTION IN WOMEN WITH FIBROMYALGIA
    (2017) PONTES FILHO, M. A. G.; FUSCO, H. C. S. D. C.; CONSOLO, R. T.; FERREIRA, E. A. G.
  • conferenceObject
    INCREASED PREVALENCE OF METABOLIC SYNDROME IS ASSOCIATED TO NEPHROLITHIASIS BUT NOT TO THE PRESENCE OF TOPHUS IN GOUT PATIENTS
    (2012) MELLO, F. M.; TOMITA, F. R. B.; FULLER, R.; PONTES FILHO, M. A. G.; BARROS, T. B. M.; PRADO, L. L.; AUGUSTO, K. L.; GOLDENSTEIN-SCHAINBERG, C.
  • article 0 Citação(ões) na Scopus
    High frequency of gastrointestinal complaints, but insignificant prevalence of gluten-sensitive enteropathies in Brazilian fibromyalgia patients
    (2023) ZANETTI, Caio Bosquiero; PONTESA, Marco Antonio Goncalves; MOURA, Eduardo Guimaraes Hourneaux de; DOMICIANO, Diogo Souza
    Introduction/Objectives: Coeliac disease (CD) and non-coeliac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) cause symptoms like those seen in patients with fibromyalgia (FM) and functional gastrointestinal disorders. There is no consistent data on frequency of these symptoms and no study performed duodenal biopsies to investigate CD/NCGS in Brazilian FM patients. Therefore, we sought to verify the prevalence of CD/NCGS in FM patients and the association between gastrointestinal manifestations and FM symptoms.Material and methods: Sixty-two individuals with FM (ACR2010) were recruited from FM outpatient clinics of a tertiary hospital. Clinical evaluation included the Widespread Pain Index (WPI), Severity Symptom Scale (SS), Polysymptomatic Distress Scale (PDS), and Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ). Subjects were screened for the presence of coeliac antibodies and upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (duodenal biopsies) was performed for diagnosis of CD/NCGS.Results: 46 (74.2%) women reported at least one digestive symptom: constipation, abdominal distension, loss of weight/inappetence, and nausea/vomiting. Fourteen (31.8%) presented macroscopic duodenitis and 2(4.5%) had duodenal lymphocytic infiltrates, but none met CD criteria. In 1(1.6%) patient NCGS was confirmed. There was association between presence of any digestive symptom and WPI and SS (fatigue, waking up tired, cognition), but no difference on FIQ between patients with and without gastrointestinal symptoms.Conclusion: Gastrointestinal complaints were frequent and associated with increased degree of polysymptomatic distress in FM patients, but presence of these symptoms was not related to overall impact of FM over different dimensions of the patient's life. Moreover, the prevalence of CD/NCGS was very low. This suggests that screening for CD in Brazilian FM patients might not be cost-effective, since the frequency of CD/NCGS was very low.& COPY; 2022 Elsevier Espana, S.L.U. and Sociedad Espanola de Reumatologi & PRIME;a y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatologi & PRIME;a. All rights reserved.