Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://observatorio.fm.usp.br/handle/OPI/153
Title: BDKRB2+9/-9 Polymorphism Is Associated with Higher Risk for Diabetes Mellitus in the Brazilian General Population
Authors: ALVIM, Rafael de OliveiraSANTOS, Paulo C. J. L.NASCIMENTO, Raimundo M.COELHO, George L. L. M.MILL, Jose G.KRIEGER, Jose E.PEREIRA, Alexandre C.
Citation: EXPERIMENTAL DIABETES RESEARCH, article ID 480251, 4p, 2012
Abstract: Some mechanisms have been proposed to explain the role of bradykinin on glucose homeostasis and some studies reported that the BDKRB2 +9/-9 polymorphism was associated to the transcriptional activity of the receptor. In this scenario, the main aim of this study was to evaluate the association of the BDKRB2 +9/-9 polymorphism with diabetes mellitus risk in the Brazilian general population. This study included 1,032 subjects of the general urban population. Anthropometrical, blood pressure, biochemical, and genotype analyses for the BDKRB2 +9/-9 bp insertion/deletion polymorphism were performed. Individuals carrying +9/+9 or +9/-9 genotypes had higher glucose values (84.5 mg/dL versus 80.6 mg/dL, resp.) and higher frequency of diabetes mellitus (7.6% versus 3.6%, resp.) compared to individuals carrying -9/-9, adjusting for age and gender. In addition, higher diabetes mellitus risk was associated to presence of the +9/+9 or +9/-9 genotypes (OR = 1.91; 95% CI = 1.09-4.19; P = 0.03). Our data suggest that the BDKRB2 +9/-9 polymorphism may act as a genetic modulator of glucose homeostasis. It was previously associated to insulin sensitivity, glucose uptake, and insulin secretion, and, in this study, data suggest that the polymorphism may increase susceptibility to chronic metabolic conditions such as diabetes in the Brazilian population.
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Artigos e Materiais de Revistas Científicas - HC/InCor
Artigos e Materiais de Revistas Científicas - LIM/13

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