Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://observatorio.fm.usp.br/handle/OPI/1714
Title: Predictors of long-term survival among first-ever ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke in a Brazilian stroke cohort
Authors: GOULART, Alessandra C.FERNANDES, Tiotrefis G.SANTOS, Itamar S.ALENCAR, Airlane P.BENSENOR, Isabela M.LOTUFO, Paulo A.
Citation: BMC NEUROLOGY, v.13, article ID 51, 7p, 2013
Abstract: Background: Few studies have examined both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke to identify prognostic factors associated to long-term stroke survival. We investigated long-term survival and predictors that could adversely influence ischemic and hemorrhagic first-ever stroke prognosis. Methods: We prospectively ascertained 665 consecutive first-ever ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke cases from ""The Study of Stroke Mortality and Morbidity"" (The EMMA Study) in a community hospital in Sao Paulo, Brazil. We evaluated cardiovascular risk factors and sociodemographic characteristics (age, gender, race and educational level). Results: We found a lower survival rate among hemorrhagic cases compared to ischemic stroke cases at the end of 4 years of follow-up (52% vs. 44%, p = 0.04). The risk of death was two times higher among people with ischemic stroke without formal education. Also, we found consistently higher risk of death for diabetics with ischemic stroke (HR = 1.45; 95% CI = 1.07-1.97) compared to no diabetics. As expected, age equally influenced on the high risk of poor survival, regardless of stroke subtype. Conclusions: For ischemic stroke, the lack of formal education and diabetes were significant independent predictors of poor long-term survival.
Appears in Collections:Artigos e Materiais de Revistas Científicas - FM/MCM
Artigos e Materiais de Revistas Científicas - HC/ICHC
Artigos e Materiais de Revistas Científicas - LIM/51

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