Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://observatorio.fm.usp.br/handle/OPI/198
Title: Relation of Uric Acid to Serum Levels of High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein, Triglycerides, and High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol and to Hepatic Steatosis
Authors: KEENAN, TanyaBLAHA, Michael J.NASIR, KhurramSILVERMAN, Michael G.TOTA-MAHARAJ, RajeshCARVALHO, Jose A. M.CONCEICAO, Raquel D.BLUMENTHAL, Roger S.SANTOS, Raul D.
Citation: AMERICAN JOURNAL OF CARDIOLOGY, v.110, n.12, p.1787-1792, 2012
Abstract: Increased uric acid (UA) is strongly linked to cardiovascular disease. However, the independent role of UA is still debated because it is associated with several cardiovascular risk factors including obesity and metabolic syndrome. This study assessed the association of UA with increased high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), increased ratio of triglyceride to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (TG/HDL), sonographically detected hepatic steatosis, and their clustering in the presence and absence of obesity and metabolic syndrome. We evaluated 3,518 employed subjects without clinical cardiovascular disease from November 2008 through July 2010. Prevalence of tis-CRP >= 3 mg/L was 19%, that of TG/HDL >= 3 was 44%, and that of hepatic steatosis was 43%. In multivariable logistic regression after adjusting for traditional cardiovascular risk factors and confounders, highest versus lowest UA quartile was associated with hs-CRP >= 3 mg/L (odds ratio [OR] 1.52, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01 to 2.28, p = 0.04), TG/HDL >= 3 (OR 3.29, 95% CI 2.36 to 4.60, p <0.001), and hepatic steatosis (OR 3.10, 95% CI 2.22 to 4.32, p <0.001) independently of obesity and metabolic syndrome. Association of UA with hs-CRP >= 3 mg/L became nonsignificant in analyses stratified by obesity. Ascending UA quartiles compared to the lowest UA quartile demonstrated a graded increase in the odds of having 2 or 3 of these risk conditions and a successive decrease in the odds of having none. In conclusion, high UA levels were associated with increased TG/HDL and hepatic steatosis independently of metabolic syndrome and obesity and with increased hs-CRP independently of metabolic syndrome.
Appears in Collections:

Artigos e Materiais de Revistas Científicas - FM/MCP
Departamento de Cardio-Pneumologia - FM/MCP

Artigos e Materiais de Revistas Científicas - HC/InCor
Instituto do Coração - HC/InCor


Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
art_SANTOS_Relation_of_Uric_Acid_to_Serum_Levels_of_2012_eng.pdf
  Restricted Access
publishedVersion (English)528.71 kBAdobe PDFView/Open Request a copy

Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.