Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://observatorio.fm.usp.br/handle/OPI/37212
Title: Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia as a Cause of Repeating Atelectasis in the Neonatal Period
Authors: PRIMO, Arlete Esteves LopesZACHARIAS, Romy Schmidt BrockMORAES, Amanda Dias deSILVA FILHO, Luiz Vicente Ribeiro Ferreira daTRUJILLO, Daniela RodriguezYOSHIDA, Renata de Araujo MonteiroWARTH, Arno NobertoREBELLO, Celso Moura
Citation: AMERICAN JOURNAL OF CASE REPORTS, v.21, article ID e921949, 3p, 2020
Abstract: Objective: Congenital defects/diseases Background: Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a disease characterized by motor ciliary dysfunction, which leads to the accumulation of secretions in the lower airways and, consequently, to atelectasis and repeated infections. During the neonatal period, diagnosis can be difficult because the symptoms are frequently associated with other respiratory diseases common in neonates. The laterality defects should warn the clinician of the need for further investigation using clinical criteria, but the confirmation depends on a genetic test. Case Report: The objective of this report is to present a case of PCD manifesting in the neonatal period that was diagnosed due to respiratory failure associated with recurrent atelectasis and situs inversus totalis. Conclusions: This disease is not well known by neonatologists, but early diagnosis decreases morbidity and improves patient quality of life.
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Artigos e Materiais de Revistas Científicas - HC/ICr
Instituto da Criança - HC/ICr

Artigos e Materiais de Revistas Científicas - IMT
Instituto de Medicina Tropical - IMT

Artigos e Materiais de Revistas Científicas - LIM/36
LIM/36 - Laboratório de Pediatria Clínica

Artigos e Materiais de Revistas Científicas - ODS/03
ODS/03 - Saúde e bem-estar


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